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For the first twenty-five or thirty years of the settlement of New South Wales, the Hawkesbury was looked upon as the granary of the colony. In his house were held several meetings of, local residents, one on 20th January, 1807, to petition the Governor aginst the importation of wheat. Governor Bligh, who took to farming in 1807, bought several holdings on the river, near Pitt Town, near where the present punt is located. A portion of this (six perches) was resumed for public road purposes on 25th January, 1899.

When floods came the greatest anxiety was caused in Sydney and Parramatta, and floods were fairly frequent in those days. We might here mention that wheat was selling on 19th January, 1806, at nine shillings and threepence in Windsor, and ten shillings a bushel in Sydney. Some oak trees planted at the time are known to-day as Bligh's oaks. The rest of the land was disposed of when the present manse was purchased, in 1902, as it was not suitable for manse purposes.

His history and numerous occupations are fully dealt with in another place. The time occupied on the journey was sixteen hours, and William Roberts was the enterprising coachman. In connection with the brewery he also kept a public-house. In the year 1826 the members of the Windsor chapel raised the large sum of three hundred and fifty-six pounds, nineteen shillings for missionary work.

In the year 1802 the Gist bridge (a floating structure) was built over the South Creek. Trustees: Mathew Lock, Edward Robinson, Henry Baldwin. Ship and boat building was parried on at tins time along the banks of the Hawkesbury, to which reference is made in Chapter II. In 1880 two of these were replaced by Benjamin Richards and David Cobcroft. Dean Hallinan left Windsor, after a ministry of twenty-two years in the Roman Catholic Church. Another industry he started was the manufacture of salt. The leading Wesleyan laymen in these early days were:—Messrs.

The first Presbyterian Church was opened at Ebenezer in 1809. He had a house, known as the Red House, on his farm near Magrath's Hill (see illustration). Another meeting, probably called by Andrew Thompson, was held at his house in 1807, when it was decided to send a petition of sympathy to Governor Bligh. Andrew Thompson was appointed auctioneer for the Hawkesbury district by the Lieutenant-Governor, on the 21st January, 1809.

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